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Old Dogs & New Tricks | Extraordinary Thinking

The changing role of the business leader leading up to and during business growth

dog-tricks
Is the same old thing good enough?
Many of our clients approach us when they find that they are doing the same thing over and over again, or trying some new things and just aren’t getting the results that they’d hoped for. Or planned for.
While there are a number of reasons for this, one theme that occurs occasionally is the business owner who is not willing to expand their thinking to manage a different type of organization.
For example, say you had an interior decorating business. Business is pretty good, but you find that you are working around the clock – meeting with clients, negotiating with contractors, ordering decorative items, collecting money, managing money, updating your website, etc., and you have done so since the “birth” of the business. What you struggle with is that when you have a big job, you are unable to take on new customers, and when a big job is finished, you are scrambling to get new customers.
Some people call this “feast to famine.”
What do you do? [···]

Read More

Old Dogs & New Tricks | Extraordinary Thinking

The changing role of the business leader leading up to and during business growth

dog-tricks

Is the same old thing good enough?

Many of our clients approach us when they find that they are doing the same thing over and over again, or trying some new things and just aren’t getting the results that they’d hoped for. Or planned for.

While there are a number of reasons for this, one theme that occurs occasionally is the business owner who is not willing to expand their thinking to manage a different type of organization.

For example, say you had an interior decorating business. Business is pretty good, but you find that you are working around the clock – meeting with clients, negotiating with contractors, ordering decorative items, collecting money, managing money, updating your website, etc., and you have done so since the “birth” of the business. What you struggle with is that when you have a big job, you are unable to take on new customers, and when a big job is finished, you are scrambling to get new customers.

Some people call this “feast to famine.”

What do you do? [···]

Read More