Growth

Your “Tipping Point” Will Make or Break Your Company | Extraordinary Business

What is a tipping point and how does it apply to business growth?

tipping point

 

Malcolm Gladwell, in his book, “The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference,” describes the tipping point  as “the moment of critical mass, the threshold, the boiling point.” Gladwell describes examples of this such as, “Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread like viruses do.”

In the same way, business growth stages can occur, wherein a business reaches a point at which it moves from one stage to the next – over the tipping point. As he goes on to describe, going over a tipping point requires extra effort than normal operating procedures. If you think about it like reaching boiling point, at 211 degrees, water is starting to show some activity, while at 212 – one extra degree, water goes from still to boiling.

For example, your company might experience a tipping point when you hire additional staff to take on the work you expect to have at some point in the future. It is difficult because the amount of resources exceeds the amount of income or work while we push to increase productivity. Once over the “Tipping Point”, we will be back to a normal situation where the amount of work is equal to the number of resources and paying them properly. [···]

Read More

Your "Tipping Point" Will Make or Break Your Company | Extraordinary Business

What is a tipping point and how does it apply to business growth?

tipping point
 
Malcolm Gladwell, in his book, “The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference,” describes the tipping point  as “the moment of critical mass, the threshold, the boiling point.” Gladwell describes examples of this such as, “Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread like viruses do.”
In the same way, business growth stages can occur, wherein a business reaches a point at which it moves from one stage to the next – over the tipping point. As he goes on to describe, going over a tipping point requires extra effort than normal operating procedures. If you think about it like reaching boiling point, at 211 degrees, water is starting to show some activity, while at 212 – one extra degree, water goes from still to boiling.
For example, your company might experience a tipping point when you hire additional staff to take on the work you expect to have at some point in the future. It is difficult because the amount of resources exceeds the amount of income or work while we push to increase productivity. Once over the “Tipping Point”, we will be back to a normal situation where the amount of work is equal to the number of resources and paying them properly. [···]

Read More

Tornadoes | Extraordinary People

tornado and butterfly As I write this, I am sitting at the funeral of the man who greatly sparked my entrepreneurial spirit and attitude. I didn’t realize quite how deep an impact he’d made on my life until I was sitting here. You see, Larry had been an entrepreneur all his life…his legacy has rubbed off on me from the time I met him 25 years ago. Strangely, I hadn’t seen him in 20 years. Like a tornado, while he impacted my life only briefly, the experience is memorable for a lifetime.

 [···]

Read More

Growth | Extraordinary Business

 strategy - analysis - success If you have ever posted a thought or idea on Twitter (follow me while you are there! – Aepiphanni), you can probably tell from the response that the time taken to create and post the tweet barely made am impact.  Just because you posted it didn’t make it go viral.  Because it was brilliant, thought provoking, extraordinary, even, didn’t make people re-tweet it and discuss it until it trended.  As a matter of fact, if you asked many of your followers if they’d seen it, most would probably say that they had missed it and might be kind enough to look for the next one.

 [···]

Read More

Throw Your Hat in the Ring | Extraordinary Business

boxerPart of building an extraordinary business is setting and committing to goals.  Businesses don’t grow just by inertia – creeping along and suddenly becoming an overnight success.

A friend of mine, Doug Grady, recently published an article the other day called, “Throw your hat in in the Ring!” which I thought was a great piece on committing to goals.  It is part of a book he is writing called, “The Ripple Effect.”  In the article, he talked about the difference between having a great idea and actually committing to it.  He likened it to the early days of boxing, wherein if one wanted to get into the ring to challenge another boxer, he would take off his hat and throw it into the ring, thus signifying his commitment to the challenge.

 [···]

Read More

Extraordinary Business | Does the Boat Float?

As business leaders, decision-making is our primary responsibility, and what our clients, employees and the marketplace expects us to do.  From purchases as simple as pens for everyday use (or delegation of someone to make those decisions) to developing short and long term plans for the entire organization, business leaders are positioned to “lead the way!”  We must always strive to move the business forward, focus on the vision, think outside of our emotional baggage and build a thriving, growing organization.

The challenge facing business leaders is that there are so many dynamics and echoes around each decision that making gut level decisions often gives us little control over the ripples that result from them.See if the boat floats!

But we do the best we can with what we have.  We throw the boat in the water to see if it will float. The question we have to ask ourselves is: “Is this good enough.”  Well – if you are into mediocrity, perhaps it is. [···]

Read More