voice of the customer

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The Customer, Your Business & Strategic Planning | Extraordinary Business

Listening to the Voice of the Customer is a vital part of strategic planning

restaurant customersThe voice of the customer is an essential part of your company’s strategy. Whether looking at expanding into other markets, enhancing or broadening your offerings, or restructuring the business for greater efficiency, without listening, deliberately and regularly to the voice of the customer, and taking their feedback into consideration, you will miss out on valuable information that could make or break your company.

If you have no customers, you have no business.

As both a formally trained culinarian and a small business consultant, one of the shows that I find appealing is Chef Gordon Ramsay’s show, “Kitchen Nightmares,” a show where the celebrity chef goes into local restaurants who have requested his help to turn them around into profitable entities. He is also the producer of “Hell’s Kitchen” and “Master Chef,” all courtesy of the Fox broadcasting Company.

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The Customer, Your Business & Strategic Planning | Extraordinary Business

Listening to the Voice of the Customer is a vital part of strategic planning

restaurant customersThe voice of the customer is an essential part of your company’s strategy. Whether looking at expanding into other markets, enhancing or broadening your offerings, or restructuring the business for greater efficiency, without listening, deliberately and regularly to the voice of the customer, and taking their feedback into consideration, you will miss out on valuable information that could make or break your company.

If you have no customers, you have no business.

As both a formally trained culinarian and a small business consultant, one of the shows that I find appealing is Chef Gordon Ramsay’s show, “Kitchen Nightmares,” a show where the celebrity chef goes into local restaurants who have requested his help to turn them around into profitable entities. He is also the producer of “Hell’s Kitchen” and “Master Chef,” all courtesy of the Fox broadcasting Company.

 [···]

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Change Happens

Spotting marketplace trends that will impact your business in order to develop products and services to address those trends

When the weather is bad, have you ever seen the drivers that continue to drive as though they are riding on dry pavement, thoroughly convinced that nothing will happen to them?  Driving through Atlanta on morning as such I saw a car coming up behind me very quickly.  In front of me, there were a number of cars spread across the lanes, leaving one lane open.  I thought to myself “this guy is crazy,” as the car went flying past me.  Unfortunately, the driver had to swerve around a slower moving vehicle, went into a tail spin and ended up crashing into a concrete barrier that divided the highway.  Fortunately, the driver wasn’t going so fast as to actually get hurt, but she (as I later learned) ended up being extremely late for wherever she was going.  Plus her vehicle was damaged.

Do you run your company like this?  Do you continue to operate the same way, day in and day out, regardless of what is going on in the marketplace? Do you find that you are so busy “doing” that you sometimes miss the queues that might suggest to you that you need to make some change or changes in your business? Do you find that fewer people are paying attention to you or purchasing your products and services without any indication of why? Do you find that you are reactive to things that happen in and around your business?

Has it cost you?

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Efficient Marketing Practices

Identifying, Attracting and Keeping Your Best Clients

Have you ever considered efficiency in customer and client acquisition?  This might look like: your company closes one out of every 10 prospects, or out of every 20 calls, the company gets a meeting.  What about your actual marketing?  Are you marketing to everyone, or have you narrowed or segmented your marketing activities?

Many companies and non profit organizations find that they get the bulk of their revenue only 20% of their clients.  This means that if you have 200 clients, most of revenue is coming from only 40 of them.  If you have 5 clients, most of your revenue is coming from 1.  If you have 500 donors, dollars over dimes that you are getting a bulk of your donations and contributions from 100 of your donors. In any case, determining who that ideal client is, attracting them and keeping them is what business leaders need to focus on in their business development activities.

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