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No Beliefs in Business, and Other False Truths

Have you ever heard someone say that personal beliefs and belief systems have no place in the professional workplace? The suggestion is that someone’s beliefs can get in the way of business and productivity. However, modern conversations have been about wholeness, work-life balance and self expression. It seems like there are two competing trains of thought that should be further investigated.

Consider the changing workforce, with the reigns of corporations and small businesses being handed over to the Generation X’ers, a generation that is known for being, shall we say, a bit less conservative then that of their predecessors. We (yes, we) are known for taking jobs based on our interests, and staying with the job to gain specific experiences or knowledge, then taking that to the next position in the new company – creating what one might term, a very transient workforce.

Looking back to previous generations, we can see that people were defined by their job, or their profession. If one was asked what they do, it would be based on their job description. Now, based on that, what happens to a person if they lose that job? Do they define themselves as “unemployed?” It seems as though they are defining themselves as without (un) use (employ) or useless. Therefore, their job or position was what defines them, or what they believe in. It was their a belief system, of sorts, though not extremely promising nor rewarding, to most.

Could this lack of stability and personal definition be part of the reason that the Great Depression perpetuated for so long? Could this suppression of personal beliefs and belief systems be part of reason for the 60’s insistence and outcry for personal freedom and expression? Could this be part of the reason that depression and suicide in the United States is so high, and increasing, yearly?

Given that the present generations seem to be a bit more transient in their careers, what belief systems do or should they embrace? I suggest that they are forced to seek other belief systems in order to find a sense of wholeness or completeness. I also suggest that people without any stable belief system cannot be a whole, stable, authentic person. It has been said, “You’ve got to stand for something or you will fall for anything.”

Take this to the workplace. Where do belief systems fit in? When we look at a workplace, we look at the belief system that the business is built upon, in concert with it’s purpose and it’s competencies in order to help it become as productive and profitable as it can be. Anything that does not work within the defined parameters is discarded, those that do fit are enhanced.

If we look at the human side of the equation, and encourage the identification of a person’s belief systems, along with identifying their purpose and competencies, we are able to identify how that person will be most productive, and thus, contribute, both directly and personally to the company’s initiatives and vision. With the individual’s personal belief system, and the belief system of your business are aligned, the individual will most likely have a passion, not just for his job, but also, for the company.

How valuable is your human capital to you? Have you had key employees that burned out and left? Have you improperly hired or changed jobs of your employees that caused more harm then good? Have you missed opportunities to develop your team because you neglected to explore that side of the equation?

Consider defining the belief system for your business, along with a establishing a sense of purpose and competencies. This is one of the tools that we at Aepiphanni Business Solutions help businesses become more productive and profitable in our AGS Program.

At Aepiphanni Business Solutions, we are dedicated to serving the needs of small business owners. We specialize in helping you develop strategies for your organization, and are committed to your success. If you have further questions about creating your strategy or developing your vision, please give me, Rick Meekins, a call at 678-265-3908, or email us at [email protected].


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